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20130113
20130121
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
is working very past to become an information economy without being an information society. they want to be a 21st century economy with a 20th century political system and we saw that right after we put the report out you suddenly had these demonstration i assure you we had no part in against censorship in china and one of the first major decisions made was the new president was to get out there and say the chinese communist party will not tolerate unorthodox situate in the press or in the media .. >> but i mean that is the fear it would undermine the power of the communist party. >> that's right. >> that was always the fear. >> and i think in an environment where you have hundreds of millions of chinese on twitter, that increasingly are learning their government officials are worth billions of dollars. >> rose: basically you are saying their fear is legitimate. >> i think their fear is legitimate, i don't think the country is going to fall apart. >> rose: but very strong protest movement that has legs could provide a challenge over -- >> that's right. and they are so unwilling to ris
newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> susie: good evening everyone. i'm susie gharib. blockbuster earnings from j.p. morgan, and goldman sachs. but will they be able to keep up the pace? >> tom: i'm tom hudson. the growing concern over america's ability to pay its i.o.u.s is turning into a debate over the definition of a "debt default." why washington's wrangling could hurt the u.s. economy. >> susie: and from chipotle to dunkin' donuts, did fast
this era of underemployment and structural issues in the economy. >> you think the ipad is the most important new development since the i.b.m. p.c.? >> i do. >> rose: because? >> because it -- i'll start with if you look at the time of day the most common time of day for people to use their ipad is between 6:00 p.m. and when they go to sleep. when what is that known in your line of work? that's known as prime time. and it turns out the ipad isn't the second screen when people are watching t.v. for people over the age of 40, when they're in bed watching t.v. with their ipad, the ipad's actually the thing they're paying attention to and the t.v. is the background noise, if something happens they look up and look at it. why is that important? first of all could you have imagine five years ago that there would be a product that would go from zero to 50 million yunz overnight and the single most common thing to do would be to read in the bed at night? a technology product? that was to me unimaginable five years ago. so i look at this and i wonder what is there anything it cannot do that'
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)